Posted on 16th May 2013

Posted by Sophie

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How I Killed Margaret Thatcher

Given recent events, the title of Anthony Cartwright’s third novel, How I Killed Margaret Thatcher, is either unfortunate or a macabre stroke of marketing good luck. Described by the Telegraph as a “nasty little book”, it actually has less to do with Thatcher’s death, vividly fantasised about by the child protagonist, than about the death…

Posted on 14th May 2013

Posted by Sam

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How I Killed Margaret Thatcher

‘Has the quiet power of a pebble thrown into a stream, creating ever increasing circles to explain not only what happened in 1980s England, but how we reached the here and now.’ Courttia Newland  Author, Playwright and Literary Activist Synopsis: ‘All the screens have Margaret Thatcher’s face on them. There are hundreds of them. She’s…

Posted on 2nd October 2012

Posted by Sophie

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Lawrence Scott: Reading and in conversation with Anne Walmsley

Lawrence Scott: Reading and in conversation with Anne Walmsley, Wednesday, 10 October 2012, 6.00pm for 7.00pm start at 76 Stroud Green Road, London N4 3EN New Beacon Books and the George Padmore Institute are delighted to invite you to celebrate the publication of Lawrence Scott’s new book, Light Falling on Bamboo, published by Tindal Street Press. Set in…

Posted on 15th August 2012

Posted by Sophie

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After Such Kindness

Gaynor Arnold’s second novel, After Such Kindness, is inspired by the ‘tender and troubling’ friendship between Lewis Carroll and his muse, the young Alice Liddell. Revisiting the Victorian era of her first novel, Girl in a Blue Dress (a fictionalised account of the marriage of Charles Dickens), Arnold deftly draws a world in which everyone is…

Posted on 4th July 2012

Posted by Sophie

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Gaynor Arnold on Alice, Wonderland, and her new novel, After Such Kindness

But in the end no one knows the ‘real story’ of Charles Dodgson or Alice Liddell, so I have been free to imagine it – or rather imagine a whole scenario in which this relationship between adult and child is played out against the backdrop of the great social movements and religious anxieties of the Victorian age.

Posted on 2nd May 2012

Posted by Sophie

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Fiction Uncovered by…Luke Brown, Senior Editor and Publicist at Tindal Street Press

Gwendoline Riley’s debut novel Cold Water was published in 2002, when she was 22 or 23, and which I first read at the same age. She publishes very slim novels, one every few years, with female narrators who work in bars in Manchester’s Northern Quarter, write novels, fall and fail to fall in love with musicians…

Posted on 2nd May 2012

Posted by Sophie

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Heartland

Bizarrely, there seems to have been a recent resurgence in the cricketing novel – Joseph O’Neill’s Netherland, Shehan Karunatilaka’s Chinaman, Jennie Walker’s 24 for 3 – but football is still underexposed in the fictional landscape. Anthony Cartwright’s novel Heartland takes for its structure two games: the England-Argentina first round match in the 2002 World Cup,…