Posted on 23rd June 2015

Posted by Sophie

Tags: , , ,

The Offering

“Prose as controlled and lyrical as the story within, the novel is disturbing and mysterious.” Cathy Galvin, journalist, poet and Director of The Word Factory Synopsis: I thought it began the day Father came home without work. Then I thought perhaps it really began the day we arrived at the farm, rumbled up the track, opened…

Posted on 2nd April 2013

Posted by Sophie

Tags: , , , , , , ,

The House of Rumour

‘“But I don’t know, Mary-Lou,” he went on, “sometimes it feels like all our great futures are already behind us.” I knew what he meant.  There was a distinct feeling that the age of wonder was over.’ The House of Rumour is the sixth novel from Jake Arnott, and like his previous books it is an…

Posted on 24th May 2012

Posted by Sophie

Tags: , , , ,

Lucky Bunny

Lucky Bunny is Jill Dawson’s seventh novel, and it serves as further confirmation that she’s both one of the most talented and underrated novelists of her generation, and certainly one with a most remarkable capacity to cover a wide range of subjects, from Rupert Brooke to the Thompson-Bywaters murder case to autism in nineteenth-century France….

Posted on 23rd May 2012

Posted by Sophie

Tags: , , ,

Rules of Civility

Impossibly glamorous, Rules of Civility takes in 1930s New York with a dry martini and a side order of sharp-tongued wit.  With vintage period detail verging on the nostalgic, it’s a stylish tale of ambitious, wisecracking gals on the make in Manhattan. In Katey Kontent you have a sparklingly smart narrator described as knowing “how to…

Posted on 22nd May 2012

Posted by Sophie

Tags: , , ,

Lucky Bunny

‘With sleight of hand, a little rouge and a mind as sharp as a razor, Queenie Dove does battle with all the Depression, the war and her father have to throw at her. Dawson writes with a pace and humour that is infectious and her cast of characters will stay with you long after finishing…