Posted on 5th September 2015

Posted by joanna

Tags: , , , ,

Q&A with Carys Davies

How would you describe The Redemption of Galen Pike to a reading group? The Redemption of Galen Pike is a collection of short stories about love, death, survival, and the secrets we keep from other people. If I’d included an epigraph it would probably have been these lines from the late, great American novelist, James Salter: ‘There are…

Posted on 3rd September 2015

Posted by joanna

Tags: , , ,

Backlist: Carys Davies

SOME NEW AMBUSH  Some New Ambush is the first collection of short stories from award-winning writer Carys Davies. Love, loss, birth, death, betrayal, madness – they all lie in wait for Davies’s characters in their startlingly different worlds: a dry cleaner’s shop in contemporary Chicago, a mining town in South Wales in the sixties, a lunatic…

Posted on 2nd September 2015

Posted by joanna

Tags: , , ,

Reviews: The Redemption of Galen Pike

‘Carys Davies is a gifted writer. A true original. Her magical yet weirdly believable stories transport you in a breath into other lives and worlds, without a word wasted. Full of surprises.’ —Maggie Gee ‘On “Hwang”: A perfectly judged moment of comedy … I laughed out loud at the same point every time I read…

Posted on 1st September 2015

Posted by joanna

Tags: , , , ,

Celebrating the Winners of the 2015 Jerwood Fiction Uncovered Prize 2015: Carys Davies

Every week for the last seven, we have celebrated one of this year’s Jerwood Fiction Uncovered Prize winning authors. This week we’re celebrating 2015 winner, Carys Davies who won with her short story collection, The Redemption of Galen Pike. “Every story in this stunning collection is a gem and completely unlike what follows or precedes it. Davies’…

Posted on 23rd July 2014

Posted by Sophie

Tags: , , ,

Little Egypt

In 2014, the Jerwood Fiction Uncovered Prize worked with the Regional Literature Development Agencies to find reading groups across the UK to read the Jerwood Fiction Uncovered Prize-winning titles.  Little Egypt by Lesley Glaister was read by the Page Turner Reading Group from Norwich and below are reviews from its reading group members.  Little Egypt

Posted on 17th June 2014

Posted by Sophie

Tags: , , ,

Little Egypt

Lesley Glaister’s fourteenth novel is a gothic tale of secrets and damaged families. In the 1920s, twins Isis and Osiris live in Little Egypt, the country house of their Egyptologist parents, Evelyn and Arthur. It’s just the siblings, the staff, the cats, and the occasional visit from Uncle Victor – until Evelyn and Arthur send…

Posted on 19th September 2012

Posted by Sophie

Tags: , , ,

Entertaining Strangers

Confession: until now I didn’t believe there was such a thing as a funny novel. I may have smiled wryly at a Wilde witticism or an arch Fitzgerald epithet, but nothing in fiction had ever given me the unrestrained belly laugh of my favourite stand-ups or had the immediate mirthful quality of a well honed…

Posted on 2nd April 2012

Posted by Sophie

Tags: , , ,

New World Fairy Tales

I love a good fairy tale. We’re all brought up with them. There’s something fascinating about where they come from. What looks innocent on the surface often isn’t, and they change over time to portray different moral tales: Little Red Riding Hood was not just about obeying your parents by never ‘straying from the path,’…

Posted on 1st February 2012

Posted by Sophie

Tags: , , , , ,

Somewhere Else, or Even Here

I read a story in the Warwick Review last summer: “Sometimes Gulls Kill Other Gulls,” by A.J. Ashworth, whose work I didn’t know. It was spare, atmospheric writing, understated. A girl on a beach is befriended then bullied by a sinister boy. It involved an elderly dog that drowns in a rock pool in a…

Posted on 31st October 2011

Posted by Sophie

Tags: , , , , , ,

Fiction Uncovered by… Gavin James Bower, writer and editor

I’ve a confession to make: I judged a book by its cover. And, what a cover… Published by Salt, Vault: An Anti-Novel has got the sort of boldness written all over its face that, if its contents failed to deliver similarly, would just be a downright waste. Thankfully, it doesn’t disappoint. The debut novel by David…