Posted on 29th May 2014

Posted by Sophie

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Fallen Land

‘Danger is everywhere, especially in the suburbs’. Fallen Land depicts a moderate dystopian world only subtly altered from our own. Orbiting the central narrative is the EKK, an organisation that plans to use prisoners as an unpaid workforce, fine children for misdemeanours at school, and install cameras fitted in every home; ‘Private is now public,…

Posted on 1st April 2013

Posted by Sophie

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Byron Easy

Christmas Eve, 1999. The eponymous Byron Easy sits aboard a train stationed at King’s Cross ruminating over his life and contemplating suicide. At first glance the reader would be forgiven for assuming Byron is just another failed poet – nihilistic, self-indulgent, depressed and highly dependent on red wine. But on further inspection we come to…

Posted on 15th August 2012

Posted by Sophie

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The Gods of Gotham

Early one morning on a street corner of Old New York in 1845. a young girl collides with a “copper-star”, or cop, dramatically changing both of their lives. She, Bird Daly, a “kinchin-mab” (or child prostitute to those amongst us not equipped with the knowledge of “flash” talk), is fleeing from something she would rather…

Posted on 29th May 2012

Posted by Sophie

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The Translation of the Bones

Francesca Kay’s first novel, An Equal Stillness, won the Orange Award for New Writers in 2009. Her second novel, which deserves equal praise and attention, marvellously explores the capacity to feel, need and doubt faith.  Centred around the Church of the Sacred Heart in Battersea, The Translation of the Bones explores a congregation whose lives interweave and entwine,…