Posted on 31st July 2012

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Fiction Uncovered by…Rebecca Ikin, Marketing Director, Cornerstone, Random House

‘There is what I remember and of this, though a few things remain, much is lost.’ Much is lost indeed. Ten years ago Rachel embarked on an affair with a man at work, which spiralled out of control and left her and her life in pieces. Now, writing at the window of her flat, still…

Posted on 28th May 2012

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Fiction Uncovered by…Rebecca Harris, bookseller at Topping & Co in Ely

‘”HERE JOHN TURNER WAS CAST AWAY IN A HEAVY SNOW STORM IN THE NIGHT IN THE YEAR 1755″ “THE PRINT OF A WOMAN’S SHOE WAS FOUND BY HIS SIDE IN THE SNOW WHERE HE LAY DEAD” On a stone in the heart of the Cheshire Pennines, a little way from the Thursbitch valley, these words…

Posted on 2nd May 2012

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Fiction Uncovered by…Luke Brown, Senior Editor and Publicist at Tindal Street Press

Gwendoline Riley’s debut novel Cold Water was published in 2002, when she was 22 or 23, and which I first read at the same age. She publishes very slim novels, one every few years, with female narrators who work in bars in Manchester’s Northern Quarter, write novels, fall and fail to fall in love with musicians…

Posted on 16th April 2012

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Fiction Uncovered by… Bianca Leggett

Malcolm Bradbury’s gravestone is engraved with words the author used to describe one of his own characters: ‘Warm and generous, famous and friendly, witty and wise’.  It’s an apt description of a man who during his career became one of the friendliest giants on the British literary scene, pouring his prodigious energies not only into…

Posted on 2nd April 2012

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Fiction Uncovered by…Emma Garman, writer

Halfway through Josephine Hart’s final novel, The Truth About Love (2009), a mother with two dead children, hospitalized by grief, recalls her psychiatrist’s decision to marry a suitable girl instead of the love of his life. ‘He got love wrong,’ she thinks dismissively. ‘What can he do well?’ The sentiment echoes back to Hart’s famous…

Posted on 19th March 2012

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Fiction Uncovered by…Gemma Seltzer, Arts Council England

Any novel that involves whispered conversations with a series of saints, a small ghost child in a wardrobe, a six-inch feathered moth and a ‘cold river green’ house wins a prize place on my bookshelf for sheer randomness. Salvage, a 2007 debut novel by Jane F. Kotapish, tells the story of a woman in her thirties leaving Manhattan for…

Posted on 1st March 2012

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Fiction Uncovered by…Max Porter, Daunt Books

I have a blissfully undisciplined approach to graphic novels. People send me things they think I’ll like and I tend to read them on the loo. I pick things up in bookshops because the pictures are beautiful. I’m like a happy lost tourist in a vast country. Some of the most original fiction I have…

Posted on 24th February 2012

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Fiction Uncovered by…Sophie Lambert, Director at Tibor Jones & Associates

What makes Brian Chikwava’s 2009 debut novel Harare North so extraordinary is that as a reader you end up embracing his unnamed narrator, who is not only a pro-Mugabe supporter but a killer too. It’s a mark of Chikwava’s skill as a writer that he has crafted an unforgettable voice novel driven by an unreliable…

Posted on 1st February 2012

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Fiction Uncovered by…Rachael Beale, web manager for the London Review of Books

Kevin Brockmeier – The Illumination A Pulitzer for Elizabeth Strout’s Olive Kitteridge in 2009; the National Book Award for A Visit from the Goon Squad by Jennifer Egan in 2010; generous praise for Katie Ward’s Girl Reading, David Vann’s Legend of a Suicide, Denis Johnson’s Jesus’ Son, and many more – even as prejudice against the short…

Posted on 15th December 2011

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Fiction Uncovered by…Lucy Caldwell, novelist and playwright

Éilís Ní Dhuibhne’s The Dancers Dancing, first published in 1999, is one of the best, most evocative, and most understated novels about a young girl’s coming-of-age that I have read.  It is set in the summer of 1972, when thirteen-year-old Orla, the child of an English mother and a Dublin father, is sent off to…

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