Posted on 23rd July 2014

By Page Turner's Group

Little Egypt

Lesley Glaister

Little Egypt was greatly enjoyed by our reading group. It is an atmospheric and intriguing tale, beautifully written.

In 2014, the Jerwood Fiction Uncovered Prize worked with the Regional Literature Development Agencies to find reading groups across the UK to read the Jerwood Fiction Uncovered Prize-winning titles.  Little Egypt by Lesley Glaister was read by the Page Turner Reading Group from Norwich and below are reviews from its reading group members.  Little Egypt

Read more...

Posted on 21st July 2014

By Sara Veale

Marry Me

Dan Rhodes

Behind every flagging relationship lurks grief in some capacity, and Rhodes’ witty wisecracks serve to underscore the gravity of the conflicts they parody.

If there’s a lesson to be gleaned from Dan Rhodes’ Marry Me, it’s a Wildean one: mutual misunderstanding is the key to a lasting marriage. This tongue-in-cheek book, a droll collection of 80-odd comic vignettes, skewers dewy-eyed perceptions of marital bliss, offering dysfunctional tale after dysfunctional tale in which hearts are broken, egos are shattered,…

Read more...

Posted on 16th July 2014

By Books Actually Book Group

Lolito

Ben Brooks

As the title readily suggests, Ben Brooks’ latest novel, Lolito, is a modern reworking (of sorts) of Vladimir Nabakov’s Lolita, although in Brooks’ version the situation has been reversed: while Lolita is the story of an older man who has – or at least tries to have – a relationship with a young girl, Brooks’ version gives us a 15-year-old boy attempting, with some success it must be noted, a relationship with a 46-year-old woman.

In 2014, the Jerwood Fiction Uncovered Prize worked with the Regional Literature Development Agencies to find reading groups across the UK to read the Jerwood Fiction Uncovered Prize-winning titles. Lolito by Ben Brooks was read by the Books Actually Book Group from Brighton and below are reviews from its reading group members.  As the title readily…

Read more...

Posted on 14th July 2014

By The Nottingham Readers

Whatever Happened To Billy Parks?

Gareth R Roberts

We were nervous about this one as very few of us are football fans. However, this is a good lesson on judging a book by its cover and cover blurb, as many of us found it to be a moving and touching read that was about so much more than football.

In 2014, the Jerwood Fiction Uncovered Prize worked with the Regional Literature Development Agencies to find reading groups across the UK to read the Jerwood Fiction Uncovered Prize-winning titles. Whatever Happened To Billy Parks? by Gareth R Roberts was read by the Nottingham Readers from Nottingham and below are reviews from its reading group members. 

Read more...

Posted on 9th July 2014

By The Ickenham Library Reading Group

Mrs. Hemingway

Naomi Wood

I have really found it hard to put into words how much I love this book. I found it beautifully written and the author set a perfect pace that made me want to carry on reading as Hemingway’s marriage to each wife unravelled. I loved how Wood was able to show us a great depth to her characters and how each wife’s section was written in a way that helped that wife’s personality shine through.

In 2014, the Jerwood Fiction Uncovered Prize worked with the Regional Literature Development Agencies to find reading groups across the UK to read the Jerwood Fiction Uncovered Prize-winning titles. Mrs. Hemingway by Naomi Wood was read by the Ickenham Reading Group from Middlesex and below are reviews from its reading group members.  1. Samantha Everett:…

Read more...

Posted on 7th July 2014

By Bush House Book Group

Vanishing

Gerard Woodward

We enjoyed several aspects of this book especially the historical background. The detail of camouflage operations in North Africa during WWII was fascinating and based on real events. Also few of us had ever considered what was in the region of Heathrow before the airport was built or indeed whether such a huge airport could ever have been built without the use of wartime powers. Some of us will now think about this every time we use Heathrow.

In 2014, the Jerwood Fiction Uncovered Prize worked with the Regional Literature Development Agencies to find reading groups across the UK to read the Jerwood Fiction Uncovered Prize-winning titles. Vanishing by Gerard Woodward was read by the Bush House Reading Group from London and below are reviews from its reading group members.  We enjoyed several…

Read more...

Posted on 1st July 2014

By Bianca Leggett

 Mr Loverman

Bernardine Evaristo

This is a novel with all the fizz and kick of a rum and coke before breakfast.

Bernardine Evaristo is an audacious writer: whether it’s mining her own family tree for material and weaving it into a verse novel or turning history upside down in a revisionist tale of ‘whytes’ enslaved by Africans, she’s not afraid to rip up the rule book in order to tell a story her own way.  She’s…

Read more...

Posted on 23rd June 2014

By The Whitley Bay Book Group

The Dig

Cynan Jones

“The Jerwood Fiction Uncovered Prize helps develop wider audiences for emerging and deserving British writers … of outstanding work, looking beyond the debut novelists and the bestsellers.”

The book we were given to read, Cynan Jones’s The Dig, fitted this brief perfectly. Of the 17 of us who met to discuss the book, only one had heard of it through reviews in the press, and everyone said it was a book that on the face of it they were unlikely to have read otherwise, and yet the response to it was overwhelmingly positive and enthusiastic.

In 2014, the Jerwood Fiction Uncovered Prize worked with the Regional Literature Development Agencies to find reading groups across the UK to read the Jerwood Fiction Uncovered Prize-winning titles. The Dig by Cynan Jones was read by the Whitley Bay Reading Group from Whitley Bay and below are reviews from its reading group members.  “The…

Read more...

Posted on 23rd June 2014

By David Rose

Winter

Christopher Nicholson               

I’m always uneasy about novels about real people, living or dead (especially dead), but if it is going to be done, there are ways of doing so sensitively, and Nicholson has found such a way.

I chose this to review purely by the appeal of the title, knowing nothing of the novel or author. It proved an excellent choice: a novel about the ageing Thomas Hardy and his much-younger but fast-ageing second wife Florence, and based on an incident from true life, which I remembered coming across in Claire Tomalin’s…

Read more...

Posted on 23rd June 2014

By Sharon Gerber

Gretel and the Dark

Eliza Granville

Fans of complicated narrative structures and unorthodox storytelling styles will be delighted to find both contained in these pages.

At its heart, Gretel and the Dark is a story about stories, and the people who tell them. In this novel, stories give comfort, cause conflict, and provide protection to the teller and the listener. For the reader, this collection of tales bound up into this novel is as dense as the woods in a…

Read more...

Newer Reviews Older Reviews