Posted on 24th May 2011

Posted by Sophie

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The Proof of Love

In 1976, a Cambridge mathematician named Spencer Little travels to the Lake District for the summer, intending to work on the proof that will secure him a fellowship. He takes a job on the farm of Hartley and Mary Dodds, and finds a friend in their ten-year-old daughter Alice. It takes a while for the…

Posted on 18th May 2011

Posted by Sophie

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Caroline: A Mystery

A journalist is contacted by an old school friend named Shaw, who wants to tell the story of Caroline. This Caroline is the donkey Shaw’s father first encountered on a family holiday and who soon filled a void in his life that he didn’t know existed. The father became devoted to Caroline: took her home,…

Posted on 21st April 2011

Posted by Sophie

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Pocket Notebook

Jacob Smith is a police firearms officer with a foundering marriage, a steroid addiction, and aggressive tendencies. Unable to save the victim of a car crash, Jake takes his frustrations out on a drunk he’s arrested for a public order offence, which is what first brings him to the attention of his senior officers. As…

Posted on 7th April 2011

Posted by Sophie

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Told in Silence

Rebecca Connell’s second novel, Told in Silence, is a portrait of a family with secrets; no one is all that they appear to be to others. Violet Mason was eighteen, working as a legal secretary and just about to start university, when she fell in love with – and married – a thirty-year-old lawyer named…

Posted on 23rd January 2011

Posted by Sophie

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Forgetting Zoë

Ray Robinson’s third book is a novel of vast, open landscapes and claustrophobic darkness, of captivity and escape of more than one kind. Ten-year-old Zoë Nielsen is kidnapped by Thurman Hayes, who holds her prisoner for eight years in his Arizona ranch and its attached bunker, where the girl Zoë was gradually disappears. Robinson’s prose…

Posted on 9th September 2015

Posted by joanna

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Alex Wheatle announced as Guest Editor

We are thrilled to announce that Alex Wheatle will be joining us as Guest Editor on FictionUncovered.co.uk over the next month. Check the website, Twitter and Facebook feeds for his articles the first of which will be posted later this week. Our previous Guest Editors have been Simon Savidge, David Hebblethwaite, Kaite Welsh, Anita Sethi, Naomi Frisby and Adventures with Words duo, Kate Neilan and Rob Chilver. Born in London of…

Posted on 3rd June 2015

Posted by Sophie

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Adventures With Words duo announced as Guest Editors

We are delighted to announce that the Adventures With Words duo, Kate Neilan and Rob Chilver will be joining us as Guest Editors on FictionUncovered.co.uk over the next month. Check the website, Twitter and Facebook feeds for their articles, the first of which will be posted later this week. Our previous Guest Editors have been Naomi Frisby, Simon Savidge, David Hebblethwaite, Kaite Welsh and Anita…

Posted on 5th May 2015

Posted by Sophie

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Naomi Frisby announced as Guest Editor

We are thrilled to announce that Naomi Frisby will be joining us as Guest Editor on FictionUncovered.co.uk over the next month. Check the website, Twitter and Facebook feeds for her articles the first of which will be posted later this week. Our previous Guest Editors have been Simon Savidge, David Hebblethwaite, Kaite Welsh and Anita Sethi.  Naomi Frisby is working towards a PhD in Creative Writing…

Posted on 12th September 2014

Posted by Sophie

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The Language of Fiction

My first Fiction Uncovered column was about how I have found myself changing as a reader; this last one focuses more specifically on one of the ways of reading that I’ve become drawn to. For a while now, I’ve been taking more notice of the ways in which the tone and style of a piece of fiction can interact with, and add nuance to, its other aspects. To an extent, this is an artificial divide: books are, after all, made of words; you can’t really separate fiction from the way it’s written. In practice, however, it can be easy to take the language of fiction for granted – and to risk overlooking whole layers in the process.

Posted on 12th August 2014

Posted by Sophie

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Ten Contemporary British Short Story Writers

I love short stories; I think they’re a sorely underappreciated genre of fiction. So I’m going to recommend ten of my favourite current British short story writers. (This isn’t a ‘top ten’, by the way; I couldn’t – and wouldn’t want to – be that definitive. But I do heartily recommend the work of each of these writers.)

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